Remaining I-99 lanes opened yesterday during ceremony

I-99 corridor now complete between Interstate 80 and PA Turnpike

PennDOT Secretary Allen D. Biehler, P.E. joined other Federal, state and local officials to cut a ribbon and officially mark the opening of Interstate 99 in Centre County.
“A four-lane Interstate 99 between the Pennsylvania Turnpike and I-80 has been in the making for nearly 40 years and I’m honored to be here today to take part in history,” Biehler said. “Completion of Interstate 99 not only brings unrestricted travel to this area, it also is key to attracting new business and more jobs to Pennsylvania.”
The I-99 corridor in Centre County includes twelve sections, 94 structures, thirteen interchanges and 38.5 miles of mainline highway. Construction of this four-lane highway began in 1999, with four sections opened near State College in late 2002. Most of the remaining sections opened in late 2007.
“This project became a reality through the tireless work and dedication of Congressman Bud Shuster,” Biehler said. “Bud was instrumental not only for making this roadway a reality in the region, but for delivering the entire corridor.”
Among other dignitaries at the event, Biehler was joined by 95-year-old Milford Buterbaugh of Bald Eagle. Mr. Buterbaugh was a laborer during the original construction of Route 220 back in the late 1920’s.
“I’m thrilled to be standing here today with so many people on a road that I actually worked on back in 1926,” Buterbaugh said.
The opening of the Interstate 99 lanes in State College now makes it possible for drivers to travel freely between Interstate 80 at Bellefonte to the Pennsylvania Turnpike at Bedford.
Congressman Bill Shuster attended the ribbon cutting and released the following statement after the event:
“This moment has been over thirty years in the making and I am pleased to say that today, Interstate 99 is finally and completely open for business.
“Support for the completion of I-99 over the years has rested on the common understanding that this region has amazing potential for development and growth. Today’s ribbon cutting is the final step in unlocking this potential for the benefit of future generations.     
“One person’s vision made this day possible and one person set the gold standard for the effort everyone put into completing this project.  At the end of the day, our appreciation for this critical roadway goes to the man for whom it was named, Bud Shuster.”

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