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Snyder residents continue to voice opinions about new dirt track

About 50 visitors were in attendance at last evening’s Snyder Township meeting, many to voice their opinions on the new dirt track.
It seems the dirt track, now being operated at what used to be the old Kimberling farm in Tyrone Forge, has caused a division amongst the people of the township. Those who live near the track say it’s a nuisance because of the dust, the noise and the extra traffic. The other side says the track provides a safe and fun place for area kids to ride their dirt bikes.
The citizens against the dirt track from Tyrone Forge, Sinking Valley and Nealmont took their issue a step further by retaining an attorney, Suzanne Bigelow-Cherry, who addressed supervisors at last evening’s meeting.
She started off by saying that a commercial business is operating in the township, which has not submitted a land development plan.
“Your ordinances aren’t being enforced, they’re not being honored, and they’re being blatantly disrespected,” Bigelow-Cherry said.
She said the dirt track is operating out in the open, even though the owner is required to submit a land development plan.
Supervisor Charlie Diehl said it wasn’t necessary for the owner of the track, Ash Woskob, to submit a plan since he hasn’t built a structure on the property.
Township solicitor Don Gibboney advised Bigelow-Cherry to put the group’s concerns in writing and to submit them to the township.
She said she would do so, but wanted to know at what point action would be taken. She said the citizens have been voicing their concerns about the dirt track since February. She said the track is a nuisance operating in the township.
Gibboney said it’s her opinion that it’s a nuisance.
At one point in the meeting, those in attendance began shouting out comments.
One resident shouted out, “If you lived there, you’d see it, and hear it, and understand what we’re here for.”
Another resident asked why the township hasn’t purchased a noise decibel reader.
Another resident wanted to know how the dust could be measured.
Another said they didn’t think the dirt track should be taken away from the kids because there is not much for them to do.
One resident said, “It’s a place for the kids to have some fun.”
After the discussion on the track, a crowd began to exit the municipal building, which caused a disturbance, as some exchanged heated words between each other.
Woskob was in attendance at the meeting as well and said he had received threats.
Woskob said previously that he opened his business, “Area 251”, as a practice track for bikes and quads. For a fee, individuals are able to practice on the track. He said he also regularly sprays thousands of gallons of water on the track to keep the dust down. He said there are no drugs or alcohol permitted at the track.
The track began operations at the end of April.