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Looking back at TAHS football in 1931

Russia sent an army of 100,000 to mass along the border between Russia and Manchuria in the fall of 1931. The force was well equipped for winter weather and ready to strike at any moment. A possible accord between Russia and Japan was suspected in view of the respect paid Russia’s “sphere of influence” in Northern Manchuria by the Japanese military authorities in their recent occupation of Manchurian territory, although Russia ostensibly was supporting the Chinese.
Japanese newspapers said that the U. S. was among the leaders in the movement to retard Japanese development.
A new serial was introduced in the Herald in mid Oct., based on the picture version of Mildred Gilmore’s novel, “The Sob Sister,” with a chapter appearing each day.
Beauticians who dictated the styles of women’s hair decreed a new vogue of short hair and profuse waves. Then “Bob” as the style was known had the sides cut short so they could be made to wave softly over the ears. The top of the head was smooth in the interest of the new hats of the period, but below that the hair swirled and curled in reckless manner. Three inches below the hair line was the proper length for the back hair, but those three inches must curl above the hair line.
Continuing with a sign of the times, Frank Schmidt, a banker from Ardmore, was arrested on a warrant that Schmidt made false statements regarding the conditions of a state banking institution. If convicted, that carried a penalty of five years in prison plus a $5,000 fine.
A large crowd of men and women representing the borough of Tyrone and Antis, Snyder and Tyrone townships greeted Republican candidates for Blair County offices at a Republican rally held in the Municipal Building.
Andrew Palmer, borough chairman, introduced William H. Orr, Blair County chairman, who presided over the rally. Orr introduced Mrs. A. S. Koch of Altoona, who impressed her audience with the necessity of Blair County electing the straight Republican ticket.
At the El Patio Theatre, “Transatlantic,” with Edmund Lowe and Lois Moran was playing. Later in the week, James Dunn starred in “Bad Girl.”
New regulations for hunters were in effect for the Dec. 1-15, 1931, deer hunting season.
A hunter may kill only one deer, either a buck or a doe. A legal deer must have two or more points visible to one antler, or be without visible antlers and weigh at least 40 pounds with entrails removed.
It was unlawful for any body of men either camping together or hunting in unison or in any manner cooperating with each other to kill or be possessed of in one season more than six legal deer.
No special license was needed to hunt deer. Both resident and non-resident hunting licenses permited the killing of both sexes of deer. The 1931 PA legislature removed the special deer license feature from the game laws. A license issued in one county was good in all other counties.
There was an elaborate ceremony to open the new George Washington Bridge- a new span over the Hudson River that linked New York and New Jersey. Charles Francis Adams, Secretary of the Navy and relative of presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, was the principal speaker, Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York, and Governor Morgan Larson of New Jersey, formally opened the span by cutting a ribbon stretched across the roadway midway between the two states. The bridge cost an estimated $60 million to complete.
State policemen, on duty at Huntingdon, made a rich haul. Early Sunday morning while making routine checks of trucks and commercial cars to ascertain length, width, heighth, tonnage and equipment, they stopped a Chevrolet truck owned by Enrico Sabatino of Spruce Avenue, Altoona. The driver, who gave his name as Charles Pagliora of Altoona, informed the officers that his cargo consisted of grapes.
Examination revealed that the grapes were some kind of liquid. It was discovered that the “grapes” were genuine beer. On the head of each barrel was stenciled “Katz Brothers Brewers,” and consisted of approximately 400 gallons of the illegal brew.
The National League MVP was second baseman Frankie Frisch, “the Fordham Flash” of the NL champion St. Louis Cardinals
On Friday, Oct. 30, 1931, Tyrone improved their record to 5-0-1 by blasting Bellefonte 47-0 in an afternoon game.
The Black and Orange, coached by Walt Mensch, celebrated a win on Halloween and then got back to Tyrone in time for the big parade.
Wasting no time, Tyrone opened up right away. The Eagles marched down the field notching five first downs along the way and taking advantage of a 15-yard Bellefonte penalty and “Bubbles” Robinson plunged over the goal line for the first score.
Hutchinson got his first TD of the season in the second quarter and Jim Hildebrand scored a six-pointer in the third quarter.
It was the fourth quarter that really put points on the board however.
Burget and Haag scored for the Eagles, then Hildebrand raced 80 yards for his second touchdown of the day. Bellefonte went to the air to try to move the football. The Red and White, under head coach John Miller, was successful for a while, but then Burget intercepted a Bellefonte toss to stop the attack and raced all the way for a touchdown to add the final TD.
Getz booted three successful PAT kicks and Hildebrand added a pair of runs for extra points

Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1931

Blair County National Bank and Trust Company advertised in 1931, that they wanted to be the executor of your estate at a fee fixed by law. The First National had the knowledge, experience and financial responsibility of many years the ad stated, to help qualify them in that capacity. E. C. Frantz, 501, Oak Street, building contractor was the man you called for repair work. Garmans and Sons had a sale on kiddies shoes, $1, $1.95 and $2.95, “Fine quality shoes that will be very comfortable on the youngster’s tender feet.” Carl Rupert, of Rupert Chevrolet Company, 205, East 10th Street, extended an invitation to come in and inspect his new building, his excellent service department and his display of the complete line of all models of Chevrolets. Fifty horsepower, six cylinder. 109 inch wheelbase Chevrolet trucks went for as low as $440.
A stupendous prosperity program was proposed by President Herbert Hoover as a means of lifting America out of economic depression and was endorsed in principal by Congressional leaders of both political parties.
The program included briefly-mobilization of financial resources of the nation by the bankers themselves through creation of a $300 million institution to stabilize the banking structure of the country, to appeal to local bankers to “make some advances on the security of the assets of closed banks (in their communities) or to take over some of the assets in order that partial dividends may be paid to depositors in advance of the legal liquidation”, an appropriation by Congress of six billion dollars to strengthen the resources of federal land banks through the purchase of additional stock, amendment of the Federal Reserve Act to liberate its rediscount provisions, creation, if necessary, of a Finance Corporation,” similar in character and purpose to the War Finance Corporation” with available funds sufficient for any legitimate call in support of credit and announcement by the President that he would propose to Premier Laval of France, an extension of the War Debts Moratorium.
At the El Patio, you could see Clark Gable, Ernest Torrence, Madge Evans. Marie Prevost and Lew Cody in “Sporting Blood.”
George Hamilton Danks, well known Tyrone merchant, whose country home “Open Hearth” was near Lewistown and who was a a prominent businessman of both Tyrone and Lewistown died suddenly after never regaining consciousness following a stroke. Mr. Danks had been in charge of the Danks and Company stores in the two communities.
In the world of college football, Army was considered to be the only team in the East with a clean slate and a heavy enough schedule to merit a look by national sportswriters.
The League of Nations resumed its deliberations toward drafting the United States, a non-member, into the League’s efforts to settle the China-Japanese dispute. Efforts were being led by Aristide Briand, Foreign Minister of France.
A unanimous decision was reached to invite the U. S. to have a representative at the council table and it was left to Briand to override the reported objections of the Japanese delegate Kenkichi Yoshisawa.
Washington was not anxious to take part in the peace negotiations.
On Oct. 18, 1931, Thomas Alva Edison died. The poor boy who rose to fame and riches and made the world a better place for his fellow man, through his many inventions was viewed by thousands in a glass-topped bronze casket. The casket was laid in the lofty ceilinged Library of the Edison Laboratories in West Orange, New Jersey. Burial was in Milan Ohio, Edison’s birthplace.
Late in the week, “The Wild Horse” starring Hoot Gibson was showing at the Wilson Theatre along with chapter one of a new serial “Danger Island”, while Joe E. Brown was featured at the El Patio in “Broad Minded.” At both cinemas, the price of a movie was 35 cents for adults and 10 cents for children.
The Shaffer Stores in the area offered “high quality, low prices and the desire of the sales force to serve you.” Beef roast cost 15 cents a pound, Beef ground from fresh meat was two pound for 33 cents. Fresh pork shoulder roast, cali style was 13 cents a pound. Ring bologna was 16 cents a pound and breakfast bacon mild cure cost 19 cents a pound. Shaffers also had a full line of fruits and vegetables. Women who sewed were encouraged to use Singer oil and needles, from the Singer Sewing Machine Company at 204 West 10th Street. The W. F. Hiller Agency at 970 PA Avenue told all that “Insurance is a fire victim’s best friend. For repairs, you could check out Carl L. Fry, 604 West 18th Street, carpenter, builder and repairs.
On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 24, 1931, fans witnessed no less than 11 fumbles. Although the Powdertown boys as the Mount Union Trojans were called by many, because of the brick industry there, gave an outstanding effort, Tyrone (4-0-1) outclassed them in winning their fourth game of the year 20-0.
Jim Hildebrand and Bubbles Robinson led the Eagles attack with Hildebrand scoring a pair of touchdowns and Robinson adding the third score.
Following a short Mount Union punt, Tyrone put the first score on the board at the Athletic Park field. Hutchinson hit the line for five yards, then Burget went around left end for 15. Robinson slammed through the line for five, before Hildebrand covered the final 15 yards for the TD. Getz added the PAT kick for a 7-0 Tyrone lead.
Late in the third quarter, Mount Union fumbled and Tyrone recovered at the MU-10. Robinson and Hutchinson each bulled into the line for three yards gains. Robinson carried the final six yards for the score and Getz again booted the PAT.
In the fourth quarter, with subs in at every position, except for Burget and Hildebrand, Tyrone got the ball at the MU-30 following an exchange of punts. On the very first play, Hildebrand, sidestepping and straight-arming his way down field, was hit at the five, but bowled three defenders as he stepped off the final yards for the score.
Tyrone had 230 yards rushing, while Mount Union could manage only 30. The Eagles tried four passes, all incomplete, The Trojans tried seven, completing one for minus one yard and had two intercepted. The Orange and Black had a 10-2 advantage in first downs.

Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1931

In early Oct. 1931, Americans Hugh Herndon and Clyde Pangborn became the first persons to fly non-stop from Japan to the United States.
The sudden passing of U. S. Senator Dwight Whitney Morrow, Republican from Englewood, New Jersey was mourned by many around the nation.
It had been Sen. Morrow that President Hoover wanted to lead the coming fight in Congress for approval of Hoover’s debt moratorium and was looked upon as a possible presidential candidate in 1936.
Sen. Morrow’s wife was the choice of many to replace her husband. While campaigning for her husband’s candidacy for the Senate, Mrs. Morrow spoke to many women’s clubs via the radio and showed an intimate knowledge of state, national and international issues coupled with a keen understanding of human problems, closely approaching that for which her popular husband had been renowned.
Only one other woman had ever served in the Senate of the United States at that time. Mrs., Rebecca Latimer Felton held the appointment from Georgia for 23 hours, during which she made a speech on the Senate floor that attracted national interest.
Al Capone pleaded not guilty as the gangster’s trial for charges of violating the Federal income tax laws opened in Chicago before Judge James H. Wilkerson.
For plans and estimates on that project you might have wanted done, you could have gotten in touch with Harry F. Beaston, 515 West 20th Street, Building Contractor, plans and estimates on all building construction, or Yenter Brothers West 15th street, General Contractors and Builders. Women could shop at Miller’s Tyrone Style Shop, 1060 PA Avenue, home of Phoenix hosiery. Fur-trimmed coats that would please, beautifully trimmed with tip skunk, squirrel, Persian mink, beaver, caracal, brown fox, lapin, wolf and other furs were available for $16.75 and up. Dresses for $5.75 to $16.75 in silk and wool tweeds could be purchased. Phoenix and As You Like It hosiery was available for one dollar a pair.
Ground was broken for the big Pymatuning Dam project. PA governor Gifford Pinchot paid special tribute to members of the Shenango and Beaver Valley Conservation Associations, who had worked for 20 years to bring their vision to a reality.
IOOF Tyrone Lodge #152 installed officers at their regular weekly meeting, held in their newly renovated rooms on PA Avenue.
Noble Grand- M. Luther Wertz, Vice Grand- William Eckert, Secretary- Charles W. Krider, Treasurer- C. Nevin Waite, Third Relief- Walter A. Houck, Trustee- W. C. Fromm, Right Supporter to Noble Grand- W. C. Fromm, Left Supporter to Noble Grand- Elmer Singley, Warden- Sam J. Shab, Conductor- Abram H. Briner, Right Scene Supporter- Abram Etter, Left Scene Supporter W. C. Garland, Chaplain- N. H. Ryan, Outer Guard- Wm. L. Cahill, Inner Guard- Irvin M. Katherman, Right Supporter to Vice Grand- A. E. Kalstrom, Left Supporter to Vice Grand- Oscar A. Piper.
Japan served an ultimatum upon China demanding protection of the lives and property of it’s nationals in Manchuria and announced strong detachments of warships would be dispatched unless the required guarantees were given immediately.
In London, King George dissolved the House of Parliament at the request of English Prime Minister J. Ramsey MacDonald.
The dissolution of Parliament was to make way for a new general election that was expected shortly. The King stressed the gravity of the existing financial and economic situation as prime causes for the action.
Rothert’s Company, 29-31-33, West 10th Street, advertised new dresses for the Fall season in the new shades and materials, from $5 to $16.50. Also Rothert’s had the new one-minute electric washer for only $69.50, with a free demonstration in your home and easy payments. The First National bank of Tyrone, warned that “when hard times come again, there is no substitute for a savings account in this bank.” If you needed tobacco, dental needs or a fountain special, Rea and Derick’s Cutright 1056 Pa Avenue offered needed supplies or a fresh strawberry Sundae for 20 cents, a cool lemonade for 10 cents as well as baby needs, hair items, face powders and creams and many other items. You could purchase Philco, the world’s largest selling radio, Philco at Strasbaugh’s Service Station, 121 West 10th Street, C. T. Snyder Electric, 1520 Columbia Avenue or Harpster’s Service Station RD 3. A Philco baby Grand complete with tubes went for $49.95 or a Superheteredyne radio-phonograph cost $110.
Tyrone claimed their third victory without a loss on Saturday Oct. 17, 1931 by downing a scrappy Bedford squad 19-6. The Orange and Black (3-0-1) held on to first place in the Western Conference with the win, holding Bedford out of the endzone on three different occasions after the Bisons drove inside the Tyrone five-yard line.
After the Tyrone defense forced Bedford to punt on the first offensive series of the game, it took just one play to get on the scoreboard. Burget broke through the line and raced 40 yards for the score. The extra point try failed but Tyrone was in front 6-0.
Ike Hagg recovered a fumble for the Eagles, but Tyrone was unable to move the ball and had to kick.
Bedford stormed down the field on end runs, including one by Riggs that covered 40 yards. With first and goal at the T-5, the Tyrone defense refused to yield another yard and took over on downs to stop one threat.
Early in the second quarter the Bisons drove to the Tyrone-eight with Riggs racing for a 20-yard pickup on the first call, before again the defense stiffened and Tyrone took over on downs.
The game was delayed 45 minutes at halftime because Tyrone protested the Bedford jerseys as illegal and in violation of regulations. The officials allowed the pretest and Bedford played the second half in Tyrone’s “zebra” shirts.
Bedford received the kick to start the third quarter and quickly marched to the Tyrone-15, where the Bisons fumbled and Tyrone recovered.
Riggs got off a short punt for Bedford and Burget went around left end on the opening play, then reversed his field, galloping for his second touchdown and a 12-0 lead.
Hildebrand had to punt for the Eagles, booting it against a strong wind landing on the Bedford 15 and bounding into the endzone-an incredible 80-yard punt into the wind.
Bedford’s return punt was very short, with the Eagles taking over at the Bisons’ 25. For the third time in the game, the Eagles took just one play to score. This time it was Hildebrand, behind some beautiful blocking racing 25 yards for the TD. Getz kicked the PAT.
Bedford finally scored after Tyrone had a comfortable three-TD cushion to set the final score at 19-6.

Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1931

A tropical hurricane that practically wiped out the city of Belize in British Honduras, struck St. John’s College, killing 10 American members of the faculty there in mid-Sept. 1931.
Lieutenant G. H. Stainforth set a new airplane speed record of 388 miles per hour. Stainforth is a member of the British Schneider Cup team. His performance prompted American Maj. Jimmy Doolittle to say that he sees no limit to the speed that may be attained in the air. Captain Frank Hawks predicted that within four years, the 500-mile per hour velocity would be attained.
For the first time in our nation’s history, two blind men were members of the U. S. Senate at the same time.
Thomas P. Gore, Democrat from Oklahoma, was joined by Progressive Republican Thomas D. Schall of Minnesota. Gore was serving his third term, while the Minnesota solon was entering his second term in the Senate after serving 10 years in the House of Representatives.
Great Britain lowered their gold standard to avert a crisis. The British people were advised to keep steady nerves and cool heads as the government made an effort to alleviate the financial crisis. In Britain, the price of gold dropped three and one half cents per ounce.
With 11 seniors graduating from Penn State’s football team, a promising group of sophomores were out to make the starting lineup for the Nittany Lions in the fall of 1931. Husky lineman Bill Barr, a former Tyrone grid star, had been injured during the summer, but was expected to round into form quickly when he reported to practice.
Brigadier General Edward L. Shannon. Lieutenant Governor of the state spoke at the Chamber of Commerce Dinner held at the Masonic Building.
Gen. Shannon was well known in the Tyrone area, for during World War I he was in command of the 111th Infantry of the 28th Division and with his regiment participated in all of the action in France that earned this division immortal fame.
It was in the midst of battle that he earned for himself the name of “Two-yard Shannon” for in every engagement he took his place, two yards ahead of his regiment.
A leader of men in war, Shannon was a leader of men in peacetime. He was the head of a large manufacturing establishment in Columbia. PA and in the past year had devoted much of his time to the development and training of the National Guard of Pennsylvania as a part of the first line of defense of the U. S. In 1931, he was a brigadier general commanding the 52nd Cavalry Brigade, generally recognized as the finest mounted force in this country.
William B. Hicks, president of the Chamber of Commerce presided over the meeting and Maj. B. C. Jones introduced Brigadier General Shannon.
The Ladies of the Civic Club served the dinner and orchestral music provided entertainment during the dinner. Later, the recently renowned Westvaco Quartet provided songs and Harry Smith led the singing.
Bucknell football began for Merle “Tarzan” Stonebraker and Forest “Eli” Priest, two Tyrone grads. Stonebraker has attended the university and played football for two years, while Priest was a member of the undefeated freshman team in 1930. The season started with a battle against St. Thomas.
Stonebraker came to Bucknell from New York Military Academy, while Priest was graduated from the Keystone Academy.
Stonebraker was on every Al-opponent team on the Bucknell schedule in 1930. Coach Carl Snavely was said to regard Stonebraker as one of the best ha has had in his coaching career.
Japan invaded Manchuria, which proved to be a great test for the League of Nations.
Manchuria invoked a non-resistance policy and China refused to be a party to the new war in Asia.
It was the Philadelphia Athletics against the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1931 baseball World Series.
Champions of the American league, the Athletics were managed by ageless Connie Mack, whose real name was Cornelius McGillicudy and played in Philadelphia at Shibe Park.
The Cards, champions of the National League played at Sportsman Park and were managed by Gabbie Street.
For the A’s the pitching rotation included Left Grove, Rube Walberg, George Earnshaw and Waite Hoyt.
St. Louis countered with Bill Hallahan, Burleigh Grimes and Paul Derringer.
The commissioner of baseball was Kennesaw Mountain Landis, who had been hired for his strictness and honesty following the infamous Black Sox Scandal of 1919.
St. Louis and Philadelphia battled all the way through the first six contests dead even before the Cardinals took the seventh game and the championship.
On Saturday, Oct. 10, 1931, the Tyrone Golden Eagles upped their record to 2-0-1 with a 14-0 win over Clearfield at the losers field.
With Robinson and Burget returning to the backfield and Aurand, Waple, Rodgers and Berkstresser again on the line after missing time due to injuries, the Orange and Black controlled the game for just about the entire first three quarters. Although Tyrone had several opportunities to get into the Clearfield endzone, fumbles spoiled each occasion.
In the second quarter, Bubbles Robinson scooted 30 yards off tackle for the longest run of the afternoon, then picked up gains of 10 and 11 yards on the same play to get the pigskin to the Bisons-29. Hildebrand gained nine around left end and Robinson reached the 15-yard line with a seven yard pickup through right tackle. Another fumble stopped that drive however.
Robinson finally score from seven yards away on a drive that began late in the third quarter and carried over into the fourth. Getz added the PAT kick.
After forcing Clearfield to punt, Tyrone started another march immediately. Burget dropped back and heaved a perfect pass to Getz, who picked up 25 yards on the play. After three running plays netted another first down at the Bison-12, Burget and Getz worked to combine for the 12-yard TD pass and Getz also booted the PAT.
Burget also completed a 15-yard pass to Getz on the Eagles’ next offensive series, but the game ended 14-0 in favor of the Orange and Black.

Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1931

Japanese premier Reijuro Wakatsoki welcomed Col. and Mrs. Charles Lindbergh to Japan.
Democrats from New York called upon the New York legislature to endorse William Randolph Hearst. The noted publisher proposed that Congress pass a five billion dollar prosperity loan for public works. The plan was an extensive request for economic relief and also would benefit the future by the improvements made.
Uncle John Porter was honored at the Kiwanis Mess Hall at Camp Anderson at a surprise birthday party. A sumptuous feast was served by chef Charles Dressel at the party given by Porter’s son-in-law and daughter Mr. and Mrs. Clyde S. Wyan in the afternoon.
Boy Scout commissioner Connie Fernau was supposedly taking Porter to a Scout meeting in State College, but had to stop at Camp Anderson to pick up an article he needed that he had left there.
W. H. Sullin served as toastmaster and many delightful responses were made by District Attorney Richard H. Gilbert, Burgess Raymond Hagerman, F. K. Lukenbach, W. C. Barr, Connie Fernau, Dr. A. B. Harrier, A. S. Wiliams, William Fisher and many other guests.
In response to his guests, Uncle John reminisced about his career as a Scout leader and recited many interesting anecdotes.
Att. William Hicks presented Porter with a beautiful desk set and leather traveling case.
At the J. C. Davis Motor Sales, 17 East 10th Street you, could purchase the latest model Graham automobiles in either six or eight cylinder models. The Prosperity Six 70 horsepower with a 113-inch wheelbase sold for $775, while the Special Eight with 85 horsepower and a 120-inch wheelbase went for $985. Frank L. Stonebraker was the manager. Harpers Service Station on Rt. 220 between Tyrone and Bald Eagle featured Tydol, Sunoco and Texaco gas and oils. The newest Philco radios could be obtained there, with the new 1932 models ranging in price from #36.50 to $295. Melvin Harper was the proprietor and time payments could be arranged. If you needed money for your purchases, Personal Finance Company, in the First National Bank Building on the second floor, formerly Beneficial Loan Society was giving out cash loans from $10-$300 with only a small monthly repayment. For that do-it-at-home project, Rhodes Planing Mill at 1615 Clay Avenue could supply lumber and planing work.
Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi arrived in Marseilles, France for the second Indian Roundtable Conference that was to take place in London.
In the entertainment world, half a million dollars was the price placed on lost love. A suit was filed against actress Marlene Dietrich by Rita Von Sternberg alleging alienation of her husband’s affections for that amount.
The rumor about the actress and the movie director was efficiently quashed by Dietrich’s husband Rudolph Sieber, who the movie actress brought to the United States as a gesture of her love for America and it’s reception of her. Sieber made a public declaration of confidence in his famous wife, stating that relations between his wife and Josef Von Sternberg were purely those that normally exist between director and star. The Von Sternbergs had been divorced for four years in 1931. Rita Von Sternberg also filed another suit against Miss Dietrich for $100,000, charging that Marlene had libeled her in articles written for Austrian and German newspapers.
Stella Walsh of Cleveland and Mildred “Babe” Didrickson were in the sports pages often as two of Uncle Sam’s hopes for gold in the 1932 Olympic Games.
Didrickson had done 11 seconds in the 100-yard dash, 25.2 in the 220, broadjumped 18-2, highjumped 5-1, ran the low hurdles in 12.5, threw the eight-pound shot 37-1, the javelin 133-5 1/2 and thrown a baseball 268-10 1/2, She had also bowled a 285 game with a 186 average and routinely shot a round of 18 holes of golf in 90 or less.
Peck’s Service Station, 309, Tenth Street, had Atlantic’s White Flash gasoline and “history’s lowest prices on 1931 tires. Goodyear tires sold from $4.98 to $7.10. Women could have their hair done by Alma Wallace at 41 East 10th Street where a genuine Eugene Wave was $5.50 or an Azure Dream Wave could be procured for $4. Danks and Co. featured children’s rayon lingerie. Boomers, panties and vests were on sale, sizes 4-12 25 cents each. Rayon slips cost 69 cents. An advance showing of the smart Fall line in bags, Printzess coats $25-$59.50 and gloves from $2.95 with just a small deposit to hold the items.
Tyrone and Osceola Mills played to a scoreless tie on Saturday afternoon, Oct. 3, 1931 at the Athletic Park.
Osceola Mills brought their band to perform, lots of fans and a team that was larger in size than the local players, The Indians kept Tyrone on the defensive all afternoon. The Orange and Black was without a first down through the first three quarters, finally compiling three to nine for the visitors.
Osceola outgained Tyrone on the ground 174-84 and the Eagles were able to complete just one pass of six thrown for five yards.
Tyrone coach Walt Mensch was forced to play several second stringers due to injuries. Aurand and Rodgers did get into the game in the final quarter and were lifesavers. Waple was out with Gunsallus subbing for him. Getz was knocked out of the game in the fourth quarter with Vanneman taking his place in the lineup.
Tyrone played superbly on defense recovering four Osceola fumbles that helped to keep the Eagles in the game.
The Eagles had a chance to score in the fourth quarter when they finally were able to put something together, but two five-yard penalties and the failure to complete a pass on fourth down spoiled that threat.
Hildebrand’s punting was a bright spot for Tyrone and Drake and Haag were terrors on defense in keeping Osceola, with a 215-pound fullback lugging the ball for short gains out of the Eagles endzone.
Tyrone (1-0-1) journeyed to Clearfield for their game on Oct. 10. Robinson was expected to be back for Clearfield, but the word was that Aurand, Waple and Rodgers might not be rady for at least another week. Getz’s health was not known early in the week.