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Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

We conclude our Look Back at the Tyrone Area High School 1964 football season and the events and issues and advertisers of that time period. We wish to thank you, our readers for taking your time to remember or to be informed about a place in time we can never go back to again, and the continued great program that we proudly call our Tyrone Area High School football team.
Tyrone finished 8-1-1 for first-year head coach John Schonewolf, the Eagles’ best mark since 1956 when the Orange and Black went 9-1 under coach John Chuckran.
The tie with Hollidaysburg in the final game of the season dropped Tyrone to a fourth place finish in the Western Conference with 455 points. A win over the Golden Tigers would have pushed Tyrone into a tie for the top spot in the conference with Northern Cambria.
Altoona’s senior fullback Mike Reid set a new school record in winning the Blair County scoring race with 107 points. John Witherspoon of Claysburg-Kimmel with 82 points and John Hirt of Bellwood-Antis with 81 points. Reid broke the 33-year old mark set by Harry “Sis” Dinges who scored 101 points as a senior in 1931. Dinges was Bellwood-Antis first football coach from 1938-39, after graduating from Catawba College.
Bill Gearhart led the Eagles in scoring with nine touchdowns and two extra points for 56. Senior end Max Schnellbaugh, a converted halfback, was second in the scoring parade with six TDs and a team-high 13 PAT kicks for 49 points. Tony Singer had seven TDs for 42 points and Chuck Hickes had four touchdowns, including three on runs of 70 yards or longer for 24 points. Dave Langenbacher had three scores for 18 points and Frank Maisano, Bob Keefer, Rick Shellenberger, Bob McNeal, Jim Nau and Charlie Soellner had one TD each. Don Friday kicked four PATs and Dale Erdley rushed for one. Tyrone outscored their opponents 249-110.
Gearhart, a senior left halfback, rushed for a net 681 yards on 165 carries, to lead the ground attack for the Eagles. Gearhart gained 617 as a junior and 275 as a sophomore for a career total of 1,573 yards. Bill was injured during the preseason and was not fully utilized until the third game of the season and also was limited to one carry in a late season contest as well. Gearhart’s running mate at right halfback, fellow senior Tony Singer, a converted offensive guard, was the number two rusher on the squad with 501 yards on 125 carries. Junior halfback Chuck Hickes was next with174 yards on 36 carries. Bruce Tepsic also had better than 100 yards rushing with 114 yards on 20 carries.
Terry Turnbaugh led the Eagles through the air completing 39 of 84 passes for 695 yards and nine TDs. Bill Gearhart tossed 10 completions in 32 passes for 259 yards and two TDs and Chuck Hickes added three of six for 68 yards and one score.
Max Schnellbaugh was the Eagles top receiver with 17 catches for 452 yards and six touchdowns, Bob McNeal, another converted lineman, had 15 receptions for 242 yards and one TD and the senior halfback duo of Gearhart and Singer had 15 grabs between them (Singer had eight catches for 159 yards and three TDs and Gearhart seven catches for 99 yard and a pair of TDs).
Tyrone gained 1,821 yards rushing and 1,015 more through the air while yielding 1,149 rushing and 584 passing.
The Eagle defense intercepted 15 passes and recovered 14 enemy fumbles while opponents intercepted five Tyrone passes and recovered just five Eagle fumbles.
Tyrone was one of three Central Counties League teams named as “Outstanding” at the Central Counties League meeting held in Bellefonte. Lock Haven and Chief Logan were also selected in addition to Tyrone. Preparations for a league champ according to a ratings system was set up at the meeting to begin in 1965.
Bill Gearhart and Tom Templeton were selected to the All-Central Counties First Team All-Stars. Templeton, one of just two juniors on the First Team was chosen at guard and Gearhart at halfback was the third highest vote getter on the squad.
Charlie Soellner was named to the second team at center and Bob McNeal, Max Schnellbaugh, Bob Keefer and Tony Singer were all picked as Honorable Mention. McNeal was a second team pick last year at guard, but switched to a flanker position in 1964 and both he and Schnellbaugh received the same number of votes, missing the second team by just five points.
There were first and second team and honorable mention selections, but there was no distinction made between offense and defense.
While the league didn’t have a true champion, the Central Pennsylvania Association of Sportswriters, who had opposed naming more than one team as champ for the previous 10 years, used a rating system to name Tyrone the unofficial League champ, showing the Eagles with a rating of 23.75 and Chief Logan second with 22.0 points followed by Captain Jack of Mount Union with 17.50 and Lock Haven with 16.75.
The Central Pennsylvania Association of Sportswriters also named Tyrone coach John Schonewolf “Coach of the Year” in the Central Counties Conference, receiving all but one of the votes cast. Schonewolf is the second most successful first-year coach in Tyrone football history. Only William Skean’s 9-0-1 mark way back in 1924, is better among first-year records at Tyrone. Tyrone posted their best mark in eight years in 1964, in addition to beating both Lewistown and Lock Haven both for the first time since 1956, and was the first Eagles team since 1956, to record two shutout victories in the same season.
Schonewolf is the 15th head coach at Tyrone, having served as an assistant under Ron Corrigan for four years and then replacing Corrigan when he retired from coaching at the end of the 1963 season to attend graduate school. Schonewolf was a graduate of William Penn High School in Harrisburg, where he played football for three years. He was named to a First Team position at tackle on the Central Penn League All-Star Team and served as co-captain at William Penn his senior year.
Upon graduation, Schonewolf attended Lock Haven State College, where he was a four-year member of the football team at tackle, including being part of an undefeated squad as a sophomore. During his senior year at Lock Haven, coach Schonewolf was named to the Honorable Mention list on the Pennsylvania State College All-Star team. He graduated from Lock Haven and began his teaching career at Tyrone. He also had coached the Golden Eagles track team for the previous three years.
Tom Templeton, a junior tackle, was selected to the Honorable Mention List of the United Press International All-State Football Team in 1964 and senior running back Bill Gearhart received Honorable Mention honors on the Associated Press All-State Team.
Members of the squad included: Seniors Bill Gearhart, Jim Nau, Bruce Tepsic, Bob McNeal, Max Schnellbaugh, Tony Singer, George Eckroth, Milt Updyke, Jim Thomas, Bob Keefer, Ron Iadorola, Max Soellner, Bill Carson, Jim Crampton and Dave Kimmel. Juniors Terry Turnbaugh, Chuck Hickes, John Forcey, Dave Langenbacher, Frank Maisano, Charlie Soellner, Craig Batcheler, Melvin Romano, John Hoover, Tom Templeton, Randy Smith, Don Friday and Nick Delozier.
Sophomores: Bob Mertiff, Dave Holmes, Gene Reese, George Dean, Rick Shellenberger, Dale Erdley, Terry Bonsell, Larry Albright, Bob Stewart, Curt Werner, Dave Rhoades, Jim Brown, Mike Androski, Tim Singer, Steve Hall, John Sultage, Charles Hoover, Tom Hostler, Ray Beckwith, George Mayhue, Bill McElwain, Jack Walk, George Shultz, Paul Frye, Doug Brown Dick Updyke, Dick Fisher and Lynn Kahley.
For your enjoyment return to past glories of Tyrone High School football and the Tyrone area with us next fall when during the 2003 football season, we will Look Back at Tyrone Football during 1931, when head coach Walter Mensch led the Golden Eagles (8-1-1) to their second straight eight-win season.

Categories
Sports

Looking Back at TAHS Football in 1964

At W. C. Morrow and Sons, 207 East 10th Street, you could buy toy tractors, plows, pickup trucks or hydraulic dump trucks to stock up early for Christmas, 1964. Or you could give a portrait from Fortay Studio, 1263 PA Avenue-A Fortay portrait, The Christmas gift. If you leaned to the practical side of gift-giving, Bob’s Electric, 1104 PA Avenue, featured SpeedQueen washers with double walls and bowl-shaped tubs for $119.95. Gardner’s Candy, 30 West 10th Street, had a different treat on sale every weekend, including marshmallows, caromellows and coconut mallows for just 44 cents a pound. If you really wanted to give a big gift, but wanted to stay on the sensible side, Black Brothers Ramblers, 10th Street and Logan Avenue offered the chance to “See the Sensible Spectacular at your Rambler dealer,” -three new different sizes, three new different wheel bases, seven new spectacular engines.
The Soviet Union’s new leadership opened the door to talks with the Communist Chinese. The firing of former Russian leader Nakita Krushchev made the talks possible, the Chinese having openly called for his dismissal as a condition for better relations. Diplomats saw little hope his successors, Communist Party chief Leonid Brezhnev and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin could easily solve the differences between the two Communist giants.
Peking seemed to be in no hurry to come to terms and the recent Chinese nuclear explosion had reinforced China’s prestige and may have hardened their position.
The work stoppage of GM plants by the huge United Automobile Workers union ended following a 31-day strike. Full production was still not back to normal however, blocked until a final settlement had been reached with local issues still withstanding and some 25 plants were still closed.
UAW vice-president Leonard Woodcock called an end to the national strike after 95 of the 97 locals voted by overwhelming majority to endorse the agreement with GM and end the strike.
Just before the general election, a UPI survey had President Lyndon Johnson was leading in 36 states with 433 electoral votes to just 71 electoral votes for Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater.
Not even that large prediction was accurate however. When the votes had all been counted, LBJ had won by an even larger majority, getting the electoral votes from a whopping 44 states. Goldwater was able to take just his own state of Arizona and five more, all in the deep south, which had traditionally been solid Democratic country. The Democrats, in addition, upped their majority in the House of Representatives by 38 seats and remained in control of the U. S. Senate with a 66-34 advantage as well.
Hugh Scott was re-elected to the U. S. Senate from PA, the only Republican state-wide candidate to avoid getting caught by the Democrat/Johnson landslide.
In Tyrone borough, the Johnson/Humphrey Democratic ticket won by 1468-1439 margin over the Goldwater/Miller Republican ticket. Snyder Township gave the win to Johnson/Humphrey 484-410.
Blair County voted Johnson 25,164-Goldwater 23,693. Nearby Bellwood borough voted Goldwater/Miller 502-Johnson/Humphrey 380 and Antis Township also went for the Republican Goldwater/Miller ticket 702-663.
President Johnson set three major goals for the next four years-1. Maintain world peace with a foreign policy based on conviction that war can be avoided through patience, firmness and steady vigilance. 2. Domestic policies aimed at realizing what Johnson called “the Great Society,” in which poverty and racial injustice would be eliminated, children would receive an adequate education and old people would be assured of medical care. 3. Finally, LBJ would be concerned with winning a place in history, not as a “wheeler dealer,” politician, but as a great and strong president in the tradition of Franklin B. Roosevelt.
Cotton Davidson, quarterback of the American Football League Oakland Raiders, tossed five TD passes in a 40-7 romp over the Denver Broncos, hitting 22 of 34 passes for 411 yards. Mike Mercer of Oakland broke the record he had previously shared with George Blanda of the Houston Oilers for consecutive PAT kicks. Mercer stretched his record to 65.
Henry Fonda, Cliff Robertson and Edie Adams were starring at the Wilson and El Patio Theaters in “The Best Man.” Later in the week, Ernest Borgnine, Joe Flynn, Tim Conway and the entire crew from the weekly television series was appearing on the wide screen in “McHale’s Navy.”
Notre Dame replaced Ohio State as the No. One major college football team in the UPI coaches poll. The Fighting Irish (6-0) began the 1964 season in seventh place and had moved up in the poll at least one place each week. This was the first time, Notre Dame had been ranked at the top since Sept. 1954.
It wasn’t a loss for Tyrone (8-1-1) in their season finale against Hollidaysburg, but it wasn’t a win either. The Golden Eagles and Golden Tigers (6-3-1) fought to a 13-13 deadlock at Gray Memorial Field before another crowd of 6,000.
All four touchdowns came on or following breaks.
Hollidaysburg drove from their own 38 to the Tyrone-1 early in the second quarter where the Eagle defense came up with a rugged goal line stand to stop the potential scoring threat. Dave Langenbacher and Tom Templeton made first contact on an attempted quarterback sneak by the Hollidaysburg quarterback.
Tyrone went a quick three and out and had to punt. The Tigers marched right down to the Eagle-20, where again the Tyrone defense took the ball away without any further scoring.
Following an exchange of punts, Tony Singer got a couple of first-down yards. Terry Turnbaugh went back to pass for the Eagles, was hit and on the way down started the forward arm motion for an attempted pass. Officials ruled it a fumble and the Golden Tigers returned it 40 yards for the first score of the game.
The second half began with a bang that turned out to be only a whimper. Chuck Hickes fielded the kickoff at the Tyrone-12 and raced straight up the middle through a gaping hole for an apparent 88-yard touchdown. Clipping was detected at the Hollidaysburg four-yard line and the ball brought back to the H-19. Hollidaysburg pushed Tyrone back to the 34 where Turnbaugh punted to the Tigers-8.
Hollidaysburg moved the ball out to their own 34, when Jim Nau recovered a fumble for the Eagles. From the 25, Bill Gearhart picked up two yards, then 11 more on the second try. Bob McNeal appeared trapped, but got out and rambled for 10 yards to the H-2. Turnbaugh then had his number called for a sneak on two successive plays, getting the one-yard TD.
Hollidaysburg blocked a Turnbaugh punt on a low snap from center and the Tigers recovered the pigskin in the endzone for their second TD.
Tyrone drove to the Hollidaysburg-15 before being driven back. The Tigers were able to go nowhere and Tyrone blocked their punt. Charlie Soellner picked up the loose ball at the H-10 and ran it in for the TD. Max Schnellbaugh passed to Bill Gearhart for the PAT that tied the game at 13-all.
Chuck Hickes recovered a fumble on the next series and Tyrone drove to the Hollidaysburg-2 before being thwarted again. The big play in the series was a razzle-dazzle halfback pass with Turnbaugh handing off to Tony Singer, who in turn handed off to Gearhart, who fired a perfect strike to Schnellbaugh, who had slipped past his Tiger defender down field. Schnellbaugh grabbed the pass around the 20 and carried it to the H-10.

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Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

By BOB MILLER
Daily Herald Sports Editor
International affairs highlighted the news stories in late October-Early November 1964. Two Communist powers shared the spotlight.
Red China set off an atomic bomb in the western region of China. The explosion came 17 days after U. S. Secretary of State Dean Rusk issued a warning that Communist China could detonate a nuclear device “at any time.” But Rusk pointed out, it would be a long time between such a test explosion and Red China’s possible possession of a stockpile of such weapons with a modern delivery system.
In the Soviet Union, there was a thorough house cleaning of Nakita Krushchev’s top aides took place. Krushchev himself was believed to be in total political disgrace. His son-in-law Alexei Adzhubel, who was editor of the government newspaper Izvestia and at least six other top government officials were also given the ax along with him.
In Krushchev’s place, Leonid Brezhnev, Communist party leader and Alexei Kosygin, premier, the new leaders promised to continue his policies, including peaceful co-existence with the west, a hard line toward the Communist Chinese in Peking and a better life at home.
In the music world, Cole Porter, the famous songwriter and lyricist died at the age of 71, in Santa Monica. Porter’s cheerful, sophisticated lyrics and hauntingly beautiful melodies became his trademark in an era that saw the rise of such fellow composers as George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, Larry Hart and Oscar Hammerstein.
A few of his most loved tunes, include, “I Love Paris,” “Night and Day,” and “Begin the Begine,” sent him to the top of American musical theater.
In 1938, he was thrown from a horse fracturing both legs. He wrote many of his best work while in constant pain as he developed chronic osteomylitis and went through 21 operations until 1958 to relieve the pain, his right leg was amputated. Other Cole Porter hits are “Wunderbar,”, “My Heart Belongs to Daddy,” “C’est Magnifigue,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,” and “Let’s Fall in Love.”
Yogi Berra was fired as manager of the New York Yankees and replaced by Johnny Keane, former manager of the St. Louis Cardinals, who had just defeated Berra’s Yankees in the 1964 World Series. The Pittsburgh pirates also showed some interest in Keane before he signed with New York, according to Pirate General manager Joe L. Brown. The Pirates then signed Harry Walker to replace Danny Murtaugh as their manager. Walker was a former National League batting champ who carried the nick-name “Harry the Hat,” because he was always seen wearing a flashy hat.
The Cincinnati Reds also sign Dick Sisler to replace Fred Hutchinson. Sisler had taken over for the cancer-stricken Hutchinson for the final two months of the 1964 season.
With the fleet Henry Carr flashing from behind to win the Olympic 200 meter dash and massive Dallas Long winning the shot put, the American gold medal take at the Tokyo Olympics reached 21. Bob Hayes, who just died in August, 2002, earlier had won the Olympic 100 meter dash. Second place Russia had 10 gold medals.
Minnesota Viking fullback Bill Brown tallied three times and the Viking defense stymied the Pittsburgh Steelers offense, allowing just 35 second-half yards in a 30-10 win over the Steelers.
The Baltimore Colts just barely won their fifth straight game of the NFL season when former Penn State running back Lennie Moore scored in the final minute of play for a 24-21 victory over the Green Bay Packers. Green Bay, the preseason favorite to repeat for the third title in four years, fell for the third time in six games.
The winners were announced in the Annual Punt, Pass and Kick contest sponsored by Spangler motors and the Tyrone Jaycees. Winners included 8-year olds-Tom Shock first, Mike Snyder second, Bill Turnbaugh third, 9-year olds- John Scott first, Tommy Miller second, Dennis Chronister third, 10-year olds-James Erdly first, Craig Richards second, Robert Anderson third, 11-year olds- Larry Turnbaugh first, Jerry Glenn second, Alan Price third, 12-year olds Stephen Panasiti first, Kim Zimmerman second, Robert Fuoss third, and 13-year olds- Chris Smith first, Mike Fisher second, Dan Walters third. Prizes included Pittsburgh Steeler football warm-up jackets, autographed footballs, place-kicking sets and plaques.
At the Wilson Theater, “the New Interns,” was showing, while at the Super 220 Drive-In, Peter Sellers and Elke Sommer were starring in “A Shot in the Dark,” and Tommy Steele was appearing in “The Dream Merchant.” Later in the week, Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon appeared in “Bikini Beach’ at the Drive-In, along with Vincent price and Martha Hyer in “The Haunted Palace” and Deborah Kerr and Hayley Mills starred in “The Chalk Garden,” at the Wilson.
PA governor William W. Scranton led the fought in PA to continue control for the Republicans. At that time, with the 1964 elections coming up in the immediate future, the Republicans held a 109-99 majority in the legislature and a 27-23 advantage in the PA Senate. Every seat in the legislature and 23 seats in the Senate were up for grabs in the November General election.
President Lyndon B. Johnson spoke by phone to the Blair County Democratic Fundraising Dinner held at the Jaffa Mosque. The crowd of 500 heard the president’s voice as it interrupted another speaker. Johnson was speaking live from the Civic Arena in Pittsburgh. Included in the crowd at the Mosque were approximately 25 Tyrone Democratic Party members.
Johnson asked party members to support Genevieve Blatt, candidate for the U.. S. Senate, the first woman to seek a PA senatorial seat, and Paul A. Stephens of Myersdale, candidate for Congress from the 12th District.
Democrats have an edge of 124,831 registered voters in the state with a total number of voters at 5,728,359. Democrats made sharp gains in the state’s two largest metropolitan areas-Philadelphia and Allegheny County.
A UPI survey had President Johnson leading in 36 states with 433 electoral votes to just 71 for Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater in the week prior to the national election
A new king reigned at the top of the Central Counties Conference after Tyrone (8-1) knocked off previously undefeated and front-running Lock Haven High School 6-0. This was tgher third straight defensive gem for the Golden Eagle defense and was waged in front of a capacity crowd of 6,000 fans at Tyrone Gray Memorial Field.
Bill Gearhart, senior left halfback and Eagle workhorse scored the game’s lone touchdown from about a foot out midway through the final quarter to give Tyrone the margin of victory.
This was the first Tyrone win over Lock Haven since 1956 and kept alive the Golden Eagles hope in the mad scramble for top honors in the Western Conference as well.
Tyrone began the drive for the all-important score on the final play of the third quarter with Bob McNeal advancing a Lock Haven punt two yards to the T-31. The Eagles then drove 69 yards in 11 plays to dent the scoreboard for the only time in the contest by either team.
Gearhart, who led all runners with 107 yards on 25 carries, immediately ripped of an eight-yard gain and McNeal came back on a power reverse that picked up 12 more and a first down at the LH-49.Bruce Tepsic, who performed yeoman duty, subbing for an injured Tony Singer, who played only infrequently due to nursing an injured leg. picked up runs of seven, 14 and eight yards. McNeal lost two, before Tepsic picked up four. From there, Gearhart took over. Tied for second in the Blair County scoring race, Gearhart dashed for eight yards, then six for a first down at the LH-4.Then Gearhart bulled to the one-foot line. Senior quarterback terry Turnbaugh was stoped on a sneak, but Losck Haven was called for a penalty with the down remaining the same. Gearhart blasted into the endzone over the left side for the sixpointer. Max Schnellbaugh’s placement was high enough, but just wide right.
Tyrone later drove to the Lock Haven-14, but stalled two yards short of a first down.
McNeal picked off a Lock Haven pass at the Eagles-19 to stop one threat and Tyrone drove to the LH-22 as time ran out.

Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

Tyrone (6-1) had moved into the fourth place spot in the Western Football Conference Class A race in the last week of October, 1964, with 442 points, behind Punxsutawney (483 pts.), Windber (477), which was ineligible lacking enough games to be considered, Lock Haven (470) and Chief Logan (460).
State College, the Golden Eagles opponent for this week in 1964 was tied with Hollidaysburg for seventh.
In the World Series, Mickey Mantle belted a tape-measure home run which gave the New York Yankees a 2-1 win in Saturday’s game. On Sunday, the Yanks were leading 3-0 behind fastball pitcher Al Downing, when the Cardinals Ken Boyer, with just one hit in his 13 previous at bats drilled a grand slam home run and relief pitchers Roger Craig and Ron Taylor tossed eight innings of shutout baseball to even the Series at 2-2.
Game Five returned to St. Louis with Tim McCarver’s 10th inning homer giving the Cards a 5-2 extra-inning win. Tom Tresh had banged a ninth-inning home run that tied the game an 2-all and sent the game to the 10th. Raw power decided the sixth game with the Yankees’ M & M twins, Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle drilling back-to-back homers to break a sixth-inning 1-1 tie. Joe Pepitone connected later for the Yankees with the bases loaded and Jim Bouton, recipient of the power display picked up the win.
With the tone set for game seven, Bob Gibson, working with only two days rest, set a new strikeout record for the Series with 31 and Lou Brock and Ken Boyer led a 10-hit Cardinal attack that gave St. Louis the World Series championship with a 7-5 win. Mantle added a three-run homer in the sixth inning, his 18th of his career in the Fall Classic.
John Henry Johnson, hard running fullback of the Pittsburgh Steelers, set two club records in the Steelers’ 23-7 upset win over Cleveland. Johnson’s 30 carries and 200 yards rushing broke records set by Joe Geriwik’s 29 carries and 182 yards rushing John Henry had against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1960.
A trio of Russian Cosmonauts, Col. Vladamir Komarov, scientist Konstantin Frocktistov and space surgeon Boris Yegorov returned safely after a day in space. The “space bus” was the first space ship in history to carry more than one man. The huge “Voakhad” (Sunrise) landed in the preassigned area after making 16 orbits.
Negro voter registration in the South topped the two million mark for the first time with most of the votes expected for incumbent president Lyndon B. Johnson.
Southern states were viewed as critical for Rep. candidate Barry Goldwater, whose campaign committee felt he needed the 43 Southern votes the party received in the Nixon-Kennedy election of 1960.
In the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Billy Mills, the slender 26-year old U. S. Marine with Indian ancestry, gave the U. S. a historic Gold, becoming the first American ever to win the 10,000 meter race. Aquatic stars brought the U. S. four more gold medals, including a 1-2-3 sweep in the men’s springboard diving led by 19-year old Ken Sitzberger. Cathy Ferguson swam to an upset victory in the women’s 100-meter backstroke and Don Schollander anchored the 1,000 meter free-style relay team to a world record. Al Oerter captured his third discuss title for the Americans.
For farmers in the area, there was the Cove Farm Bureau, 1504 Lincoln Avenue, “owned by those it serves.” Fineman’s, next to the Post Office offered girls corduroy slacks for $1.39 sizes 7-14 and ladies madras jackets sizes small-medium-large, regularly $10.98 on sale for $6.98. You could go for your photo needs to Cohens Photo Service, 42 West 10th Street. David’s Ladies Wearing Apparel, 1008 PA Avenue, proprietor Dave Goldberg and The Squire Shop Quality Men’s and Boy’s Shop, 1058 PA Avenue were shops you could go to for clothes. Garman’s Department Store, 1014 PA Avenue featured Clearfield furs- “Your best buy always, complete fur service.”
Ex U. S. president Herbert Clark Hoover, 31st president of the U. S. died. He was 90, having served as president from 1929-1932. A succession of ailments had weakened the former president and he ha d been stricken with bleeding in his upper gastro-intestinal tract which had caused an accumulation of toxic products in his blood stream.
In the AFL (American Football League), Jack Kemp and Darryl Lamonica passed the Buffalo Bills into first place with 83 completions for 1,526 yards between them. The Bills also have the AFL’s leading rusher in Cookie Gilcrest who has 856 yards on 205 carries. The Bills also lead in pass defense and are second in run defense.
After recording their first shutout since 1962, the Golden Eagle defense registered their second consecutive super performance allowing State College just one score and 145 yards total offense and the offense managed just enough to pull out a 7-6 win over the Little Lions at State College’s Memorial Field on Oct. 30, 1964.
Tyrone, decked out in appropriate Orange and Black for Halloween was able to brew up a little black magic on offense to do the trick scoring an early second quarter touchdown that provided the Eagles with a come-from-behind win.
Employing a bit of razzle-dazzle, senior quarterback Terry Turnbaugh flipped the ball back to halfback Bill Gearhart, who then rifled the ball downfield to end Max Schnellbaugh who grabbed the ball at about the SC-35. Schnellbaugh fought his way into the clear with the help of a crunching block from Bob McNeal and scooted the rest of the way for a 62-yard TD pass. Schnellbaugh then split the uprights with his PAT kick to give Tyrone a 7-6 lead and the Eagle defense made sure it stayed that way.
Tyrone won for the seventh time in eight tries on the 1964 season, while stopping a five-game win streak for the Little Lions (5-3).
Following State’s initial series, which the Tyrone defense halted at the T-18 with McNeal breaking up a fourth-down pass attempt, The Eagles moved the pigskin al the way to the State College-19 with Tony Singer hauling in a Turnbaugh pass along the sidelines, but a penalty brought the ball back to the SC-45 and Tyrone quick-kicked into the endzone.
State College took over at their own 20 and mounted what was to be their only scoring drive of the game. The first quarter ended on a 44-yard run by State that ended at the T-19. Chuck Hickes stopped the Lions’ runner at the goal line four plays later, but momentum carried the play into the endzone for the TD. The PAT effort was low and to the right to give State College a 6-0 lead.
Tyrone’s Dave Langenbacher returned the kickoff nine yards to the T-26. Tyrone got five yards on a State College penalty on the first play and Tony Singer bulled for two yards on the next. Following an incomplete pass, Singer picked up a first down with a gain of five to the 38. On the next call, Tyrone went to the trick play and Schnellbaugh’s extra point kick put the Eagles in front for good.
After the two back-to-back scores, the game turned into a punting contest, including a 47 yarder by Tyrone punter Terry Turnbaugh that rolled dead at the State College-5. Following a short Lion punt, Tyrone threatened with Gearhart getting six on two running plays and then taking a pitch from Turnbaugh and lofting a pass to the SC-5 where the pass slithered through a wide-open McNeal’s arms.
State College tried to go to the air to move the ball, driving to the T-20 near the end of the game, where Gearhart intercepted a pass to stop the threat.