Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

If you were looking for an automobile in 1964, a few of the places you could go were, Don Chronister’s Garage, 1249 PA Avenue, for Scout International trucks, Rupert’s Chevrolet, 215 East 10th Street, where according to advertisements, “it an was almost Robbery Sale” was going on all the time offering such deals as a 1957 Thunderbird for $1795, a 1962 Chevrolet four-door Bel-Air V-8 was going for $1695 and a 1963 Corvair could be had at $1795, just to name a few of the values. Rossi Motors in Tipton, Rt. 220 held an Open House with cash door prizes and free refreshments just to come in and see the new 1965 Mercuries and Comets on display. Spangler Motors at the Grazierville Bridge was an authorized Ford dealer.
The United Auto Workers (UAW) struck General Motors plants putting 260,000 auto workers out on the picket line, when a flurry of last-minute activity failed to reach an agreement.
The Wilson and El Patio Theaters were showing “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” starring Debby Reynolds and Harv Presnell during the week of the Tyrone-Bellefonte game in 1964.
Peg Nearhoof of 2201 Adams Avenue defeated Margaret Reese of Bellwood two up to capture the 1964 Women’s championship at the Sinking Valley Country Club. It was the first women’s championship at SVCC and 34 women competed.
On route to the championship, Mrs. Nearhoof defeated Helen Makdad of Altoona, Janet Stiffler of Bellwood and Betty Schroeder of Altoona.
Johnny Unitas and the Baltimore Colts flattened the Chicago Bears 52-0, gaining a measure of revenge for a 57-0 loss administered to the Colts by the Bears in 1962, the worst loss ever suffered by Baltimore.
“Johnny U” threw only 13 passes, but completed 11 of them for 247 yards and three TDs.
Pittsburgh defeated the Dallas Cowboys 23-17 as Steeler quarterback Ed Brown tossed TD passes to Gary Ballman, rookie Jim Kelly and Phil King. For the Cowboys, quarterback “Dandy” Don Meredith threw one TD pass and ran for another on a two-yard keeper.
In the AFL, Gino Cappelletti kicked four field goals and two PATs to reach the 40-point total for the Boston Patriots.
The Tyrone Rotary Club honored one of the charter members on his retirement during the regular meeting at the Villa Restaurant.
Dr. Edwin B. Murchinson, who retired after many years of service to the community as a general practitioner, was presented a plaque by attorney John W. Newlin.
A native of Toronto, Canada, Dr. Murchison graduated from the Toronto School of Medicine, interned at Erie and came to Tyrone in 1926 to establish his practice. In 1939, he joined A. Ray Flenner, William C. Morrow Sr., John W. Newlin and Robert Shofstahl to organize the Rotary in Tyrone.
Harpo Marx, the madcap mute of the famed performing Marx Brothers died at the age of 70 after undergoing heart surgery.
The zany horn-honking comedian, beloved for his outrageous blond wig and eye-popping lear, was the harem-scarem member of the troupe which conquered vaudeville in the 1920s, Broadway and the movies.
Harpo, whose real name was Arthur, was survived by brothers Groucho, Zeppo and Gummo. A fifth brother Chico died three years earlier in 1961.
“Let us snap your rusty equipment back to life,” was a claim made by Miller Bros. Hardware, 14th Street at the PRR Crossing, for paint, lumber and building supplies. Miss Deloris Libreatori offered Tyrone Dancing Classes at the Masonic Hall. For prescription chemists, you could go to Steele’s Drug Store, 15 West 10th Street. Susquehanna Valley Television Corporation, corner 10th Street and Logan Avenue offered “more to see on cable TV for just $19.50 a month. For your automobile, Wilson’s Service Center, 15th Street and Columbia Avenue, offered a “Saturday Special,” with S & H Green Stamps with every lube, oil and filter change.
A remodeled Fink Drug Store, 1004 PA Avenue at the heart of downtown Tyrone shopping area, and one of the most popular locations in the community reopened for business.
The refurbished store had new plate glass windows, baring the store’s appearance to people on the street. The store has been air-conditioned, the flooring was of concrete base and asphalt tile, with lights diffused through plastic. All merchandise is on open display and the store stressed prompt and efficient clerk assistance, available at all times.
Tyrone grad Tom Miller fired a pass that gave Colorado State University a 7-0 victory over the University of the Pacific as reported by Tyrone Daily Herald as the newspaper was called in 1964, in Sports Editor Ed Frank’s weekly column “Frankly Speaking.”
Bob Gibson won his eighth straight game for the St. Louis Cards as the Cards climbed to within half a game of the top in the NL race, while former leader Philadelphia Phillies fell to third place, while the Cincinnati Reds cling to a slim one-half game edge. The Pirates managed to maintain their 1/2 game lead over the Dodgers in the fight for sixth place in the National League.
Tyrone and Bellefonte were locked up in a shootout at Gray Memorial Field on Oct. 9, 1964, with the Golden Eagles remaining undefeated with a 32-25 win over Bellefonte.
Tyrone (5-0) trailed 12-0 early, the second straight week the Eagles have had spotted an opponent a two TD lead, but used an electrifying 75-yard run by Chuck Hickes on a punt return for the go-ahead score and never trailed after putting 19 second-quarter points on the scoreboard.
Bob McNeal returned a Bellefonte second-quarter punt 22 yards to the B-34 and five plays later, Bill Gearhart went around right end for the nine-yard TD. Max Schnellbaugh’s PAT cut the Red Raiders lead to 12-7. The Eagle defense forced anther punt on the following series and Hickes pulled the ball in at his own 25, cut to the right and behind several crunching blocks raced all the way to paydirt. Still in the second quarter, Tony Singer set up the final first-half tally with an interception, which he returned 21 yards to the Raiders-45. Going to some razzle-dazzle, Terry Turnbaugh handed off to Singer, who gave the ball to Gearhart, who threw a pass off the triple reverse. Schnellbaugh grabbed the wobbly pass for a 29-yard gain to the Bellefonte-16. Gearhart, who led all rushers with 102 yards on 18 carries, picked up seven to the nine, where Turnbaugh tossed a TD pass to Schnellbaugh for a 19-12 lead after the second-quarter blitz.
Hickes ran the second-half kickoff 35 yards to the T-48. Tyrone scored on a three-yard keeper by Turnbaugh, after Gearhart had 37 yards on the drive, including a 21 yarder to the B-12. Tony Singer also had an 11 yard scamper.
On their next series, Tyrone put the ball in the endzone again marching 60 yards. Turnbaugh tossed a 12-yard TD pass to Schnellbaugh, only to have it nullified on a penalty. No problem, the pair connected again on the next play, same result, and this time, no penalty. Don Friday booted the PAT for a 32-12 lead.
Bellefonte made it sound closer than what it actually was with two fourth-quarter scores to bring the final score to 32-25.

Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

The Beatles returned home to England during this week in 1964 following a 33-day tour of the U. S. The Fab Four took with them an estimated one million Yankee dollars.
The 29th annual reunion of the Sheridan Troop B Veterans’ Association was held in Tyrone at the American Legion Home with a banquet served by members of the American Legion Auxiliary. The singing of “America,” was led by James C. Warrender, Chaplain of the American Legion.
A memorial service was held for those members who passed away during the past year with Elmer Johnson sounding taps.
Guests included John A. Wolford, First Vice-president of the American Legion Post, Robert K. Long, Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, James McNelis, James C. Warrender, Emanuel E. Rodgers and J. Lynne Ferner.
The Pittsburgh Steelers not only defeated the New York Giants 27-24, but Steelers 270-pound defensive end John Baker flattened Giants quarterback Y. A. Tittle, forcing him to leave the game. Tittle would miss at least 10 days with ribs injuries suffered on the play.
The Tyrone Hospital celebrated its 10th anniversary. The medical staff had increased from 22 in the beginning to 38 in 1964 and an estimated 15,000 patients had been treated. Adair Shultz was the first baby born in the hospital in September of 1954 and Victor Getz was the first patient. In 1964, Earl H, Pelter was the Administrator, Robert Hughes was the office Manager, Janice Clark, Medical Records Technician, Fred Friday head of maintenance, Mrs. Claire Clemons dietitian, Mrs. Suzanne Ross Head Laboratory Technician, William Harris Head X-ray Technician, Donald Kirkpatrick Laundry Manager, Dale James Housekeeper, Felicia Cimino Nurse Anesthetist and Mrs. Joseph Grimm Director of Nursing Services.
The Tyrone Hospital reorganized at a special meeting held at the hospital. Melvin V. Getz was re-elected President, James C. Warrender was re-elected Vice-president, Williams C. Morrow Sr., was elected Treasurer, Mrs. Theda Newlin Secretary and Mrs.Gilbert Kessler Assistant Treasurer
The Tyrone Gardner Guards sought capital funding for new equipment and uniforms. The Guard reorganized and were featured in a four-part series of articles in the newspaper to help draw attention to the Guard, their history and their present need. Loss of many former members and especially the loss of their drum major to the press of business coupled with lean years for the Guard in the early 1960s.
The new Antis Township Municipal Building was formally dedicated. Co-chairmen Harry R. Gwinn and Harry I. Knox made the announcement and the ceremony included introductory music by the Bellwood-Antis High School band directed Kenneth Shucker, invocation by Rev. Raymond Lucas, pastor of the Tipton Baptist Church, and a feature address by Milton W. DeLauncey, Secretary of the PA Association of Township Supervisors.
Leonard S. Fiori, general contractor of the project presented the keys to the building to the supervisors, with W. A. Campbell accepting.
At the Wilson Theatre, the James Bond thriller “From Russia with Love” was playing, starring Sean Connery. At the Super 220 Drive-In the Beatles were appearing in “A Hard Day’s Night, ” and Tony Curtis, Angie Dickinson and Gregory Peck were appearing in “Captain Newman.”
Work on the borough’s streets neared completion as workers from Inter-State began applying the finish surface at Fifth Street and Madison Avenue in the Haag Development. Inter-State was the low bidder for the improvement project, approved by borough council at its July meeting at a cost of $10,914.24.
The Reds putting pressure on the front-running Philadelphia Phillies had climbed to just four games back in the National League with Reds ace Jim O’Toole picking up his 16th win. Milwaukee Brave Denver Lemaster pitched a seven-hitter for to claim his 16th victory, although Pirates’ hurler Bob Veale struck out 15 Braves to break a 57-year old club record of 12 set by Babe Adams in 1907.
The Pirates gained some ground on the LA Dodgers in a battle for sixth place in the 10-team league, jumping out to a two-game lead.
In the American League, the New York Yankees extended their lead to two and 1/2 games over Baltimore and three and 1/2 over the Chicago WhiteSox.
An oil tanker overturned about 4 p.m. in the afternoon Saturday spilling a large quantity of its 4,000 gallons of fuel onto the busy paper mill curve. All three of the borough’s volunteer fire companies responded quickly to avert possible disaster. The vehicle had been traveling north too fast and skidded as it approached the 90 degree curve near the bridge. The truck was owned by Central Gas and Oil of Bellefonte, which dispatched two other tankers to pump the remainder of the fuel oil from the over-turned vehicle.
Down 13-0 in the second quarter, on Friday October 3, the charges of Tyrone head coach John Schonewolf fought back to defeat Huntingdon 32-13 for their fourth straight victory of 1964 and remain undefeated.
A pair of fumbles got Tyrone (4-0) in trouble early, leading to both of the Bearcats scores.
Max Schnellbaugh was taken to the J. C. Blair Memorial Hospital, since the game was played at Huntingdon, with what was believed to be a concussion less than a minute after the second Huntingdon TD, which seemed to shake up the Eagles.
Bill Gearhart took a pass from Terry Turnbaugh out in the left flat, and made a great run for a 23-yard touchdown to cap a 74-yard drive to get the Eagles on the board still trailing 13-6 at the half.
In the third quarter, the Eagles tied the score on another TD pass. This time Chuck Hickes was doing the passing and Gearhart was once again the target on a five-yard toss for the TD. Bob Keefer set up the score with a fumble recovery.
Tyrone stopped a Huntingdon scoring threat at their own four-yard line late in the third quarter, then turned around and marched 96 yards for a score of their own. This time Gearhart was on the throwing end, hitting Bob McNeal over the middle for a 23-yard TD. Gearhart contributed gains of 28 and 11 on the drive and finished the game with 181 yards on 30 carries. McNeal had a 27 yards pickup in the series, in which he carried several defenders the final five yards
With the Eagles leading 19-13, Jim Nau scooped up a Bearcat fumble at the T-15 and returned it 85 yards for a defensive score. Nau received several good blocks from teammates along the way with Tony Singer eliminating the final Huntingdon defender with a chance to catch him.
Friday kicked off short and Keefer and Melvin Romano recovered for Tyrone at the H-47. Tyrone took eight plays for a Td with Dave Langenbacher zipping the final 18 yards for the score. Friday’s PAT effort was perfect and when a penalty forced the Eagle junior to rekick, Friday booted the ball through the uprights again to stretch the final margin to 32-13.
Tyrone has a wide advantage in rushing yards 287-182 and added 129 yards passing for a combined effort of 416 yards total offense to just 216 for the Bearcats. Tyrone moved the sticks for 17 first downs to eight for Huntingdon.