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Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

The World Boxing Association (WBA) stripped Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Mohammed Ali, of his boxing title, upholding their promise to do so if Clay signed a rematch with Sonny Liston at the Boston Garden in November of 1964.
The WBA told the top four heavyweights, Ernie Terrell of Chicago, Cleveland Williams of Houston, ex-champ Floyd Patterson of Scarsdale, New Jersey, and Doug Jones of New York to get ready for a four-man elimination after vacating the title.
The Clay-Liston rematch was banned by the WBA because Clay had signed “What was tantamount to a forbidden return bout contract” before the first Clay-Liston bout in February in Miami Beach.
Thomas McGill of Coalport, a pilot for the Peterson Charter Airline Service of Tipton, escaped injury but the single-engine Navion he was flying, was heavily damaged in a forced landing seven miles wets of State College.
The Peterson Charter Airline Service flew out of Peterson Memorial Air Field, Tipton, present site of the PPG factory and field.
In Germany, five Military police helped a wounded man flee to free West Berlin, braving Communist gunfire to help the fugitive flee Communist-controlled East Berlin.
It was the first time American soldiers had taken an active part in the rescue of refugees escaping from East Berlin and the first time that the Communist border guards shot at US soldiers. This was the serious incident in the three years since the Berlin Wall went three years before.
At the Wilson and El Patio movie theaters in downtown Tyrone along 10th Street near where the Burger King is located presently, the Beatles were starring in “A Hard Day’s Night.” Admission was $1 for adults and 60 cents for children.
At the Super 220 Drive-In, Elvis Pressley was starring in “Kissing Cousins” and the second feature was “Murder at a Gallop.”
On the TV, a new show premiered on Sept. 22. The “Man From Uncle,” a spy show starring Robert Vaughn as Napoleon Solo, David McCallum as his Russian side-kick Ilya Kurriakin and J., Carroll Nash as thier boss Alexander Waverly appeared each week fighting the evil “THRUSH.”
The 28th Annual Bellwood-Antis Farm Show opened with exhibits received on Tuesday, judging on Wednesday morning and the grand finale’-the auction on Thursday evening. The auction committee consisted of William H. Doyle and all committee chairmen.
Premier Nguyen Khanh’s forces crushed a coup attempt by rebel generals without bloodshed in Saigon, South Vietnam.
Insurgent troops and tanks at one time threatened the safety of nearly 2,000 Americans at Tan Son Nhut Air Base on the outskirts of the capital. But the rebel leaders gave up and ordered their men back to the battlefronts against the Communist Viet Cong.
There was a social every Monday night in Tyrone at the K of C Home at Blair Avenue and 11th Street at 8 p.m., with the public welcome.
Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater issued a call for “straight talk” from the administration, accusing President Johnson of trying to “manage” the news about Communist Cuba. Goldwater was waging his campaign across the South stopping in Knoxville, Tennessee.
“There are too many questions piling up at the door of the White House,” said Goldwater, “questions about Bobby Baker, about Vietnam, about private gains from public office, does he really believe Cuba poses no threat to US security?”
The United Auto Workers (UAW) worked to avoid a strike of the Ford automobile plants that would idle some 130,00 workers. UAW president Walter Ruether and Ford Labor Relations Vice-president Malcolm Denise led the bargainers to the negotiating table after a night of subcommittee meetings. The two parties agreed to a new three-year contract a day later to avert the strike.
In 1964, you could count on Fink Drugs, 1004 PA Avenue, to carry out your doctor’s orders. At Blatchfords on 1000 PA Avenue, there was a September dinette set with five pieces for $45, a Walnut inlay ensemble for $99, or a Colonial dining group for $145 and with all the purchases, you also received Plaid Stamps redeemable for goods of all shapes and sizes. On the weekend, you could take advantage of the specials Thursday through Monday at the Dairy Land Store across Rt. 220 from the Acme Market. Toffee Crunch Ice Cream by the half-gallon was 69 cents, ice milk was 49 cents a half gallon. Root beer floats were just 19 cents each and hoagies were 39 cents. Boston Cream pie were 49 cents. Shopes Garage, Dodge, Dodge Trucks-Chrysler, 1214 PA Avenue, wanted you to “haul off like you never hauled off before,” with Dodge A100 Compact pickups. Shopes celebrated their 25th anniversary during 1964.
Fullback John Henry Johnson and guard Ray Lemek incurred the wrath of Pittsburgh Steelers coach Buddy Parker and were taken out of the Steelers’ starting lineup for the game against the New York Giants. “Neither did any blocking all year,” reported Parker. The coach also said rookie Mark Woodson would start in place of the injured Willie Daniels at defensive back and Ben McGee, another first-year player would start for Dan Larose, out with a bad knee.
On September 26, 1964, Tyrone (3-0) knocked off Lewistown 20-14 for their first win over the Panthers since 1956.
Following two easy wins over Bellwood-Antis (39-14) and Moshannon Valley (60-6), this was the third straight win of the 1964 season without a loss.
Playing at Gray Memorial Field, the Golden Eagles scored once in the first, second and fourth quarters for the victory.
Tyrone head coach john Schonewolf, lauded the efforts of the defensive line, including Jimmy Nau, Max Schnellbaugh, Charlie and Max Soellner, Tom Templeton, Ron Idarola, Randy Smith, Bob Keefer and Chuck Hickes as well as Jim Thomas and Bill Carson on the offensive line.
“They just never gave up out there tonight,” said Schonewolf. “They showed a lot of hustle and a lot of team desire.”
A fumble recovery by Ron Idarola led the way to the first Tyrone score after Jimmy Nau put the rush on the Lewistown quarterback, causing the fumble at the Panther-15. Terry Turnbaugh got eight yards on a nifty sneak and Bill Gearhart banging over left tackle for the two-yard TD, the first of three for Gearhart. Max Schnellbaugh booted the PAT for a 7-0 Eagle lead.
After Lewistown tied the score on a 70-yard run by Russ Quay, who would become a Bellwood-Antis assistant coach in 1975, outran the Tyrone secondary for a 70-yard TD, Tyrone came back to take the lead at halftime.
Driving 69 yards in a dozen plays, the Eagles pushed back into a 13-6 lead at intermission. A Turnbaugh to Bob McNeal pass netted 12 yards and a 15-yard penalty gave Tyrone 15 more. Schnellbaugh made a super catch on a pass from Turnbaugh to put the ball at the two. Gearhart scored his second TD from there.
Following a scoreless third quarter, Lewistown’s Quay scooped up a Tyrone fumble and raced 72 yards for another score, with the placement giving Lewistown a 14-13 lead.
After a series of punts, Tyrone got the ball with less than four minutes to play at their own 31.
The Eagles moved methodically down the field in 11 plays with Gearhart plunging over for his third two-yard score and Schnellbaugh’s PAT kick gave Tyrone a 20-14 lead they would hold for the rest of the game. Key call in the march was an 18-yard completion from Turnbaugh to Bob McNeal.

Categories
Sports

Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

Eldred Hileman was reelected Master of the Sinking Valley Grange #484 Patrons of Husbandry at the September, 1964, meeting of the Grange. Joseph McCutcheon was elected Lecturer, Ivan Perry Steward, James Smith Assistant Secretary, Grace Stephens Chaplain, Marie Hilerman Treasurer, Alice Flenner Secretary, Clarence Hambright Gatekeeper, Gertrude Fleck Ceres, Kathryn Hambright Pomena, Evelyn McCutcheon Lady Assistant Steward, Ivan Perry member of the executive committee, and Hazel Loudon member of the finance committee.
A warning was printed in The Tyrone Daily Herald: “The use of Shea Field for unauthorized purposes will not be tolerated. Anyone violating this warning will be prosecuted. This warning posted due to excessive damage done over the last few weeks.”
The warning was signed by Paul Matusky, President, Donald Hopkins Vice-president, John Adams Treasurer, Al Price Secretary and all managers and coaches.
Television programs for WJAC-TV channel 6, KDKA-TV channel 2, WFBG-TV channel 10 and WTAE channel 4 were listed in the newspaper.
The Tyrone Mill of the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Mill held their semi-annual dinner at the company’s Stover Clubhouse. Recent retirees were honored and a chicken barbecue dinner was served by members of the Kiwanis Club.
J. Lynne Ferner, mill manager praised the group for their loyal and faithful service. The retirees included: Blair L. Foust, G. Dewey Catherman, Harry G. Laird, Esplin C. Price, Carl E. Kustaborder, Horace Cowfer, J. Harold Fuoss Sr., Herbert Daugherty, James M. McDonnell, Samuel W. Lewis and Stephen Wisniewski.
Construction of an approximate $400,000 extension was begun to the Tyrone Mill of the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Mill. Water and sewer lines were placed and footers were begun during this week in 1964.
Fourteen-year old Lenore Modell of Sacramento, California, became the youngest person to swim the English Channel taking 15 hours, 32 minutes from Cape Grio, France to Dover, England.
Benny DelBaggio beat Bill Glenn five and four to notch a win in the Second Annual Club Championship at the Sinking Valley Country Club. Glenn was the club president at the time.
A new highway link and bridge spanning the Tipton Run on what is commonly known as “the backway to Bellwood,” was completed during the week of the Tyrone-Moshannon Valley game. The section is just south of the PRR tracks in Tipton. Work on the approximate $85,000 project was completed by New Enterprise Stone and Lime and replaced the former one-lane bridge.
For last-minute suggestions for school or raincoats with an international flavor, each coat with its own headscarf from $12.98 to $14.98, you needed to stop at The New Idea, 1505-07 PA Avenue. Registrations were being accepted for music instructions in many instruments such as piano, accordion, trumpet, trombone, saxophone drums and voice, at The Music Box at Washington Avenue at Seventh Street.
Dean Phipps at 1124 PA Avenue slashed tire prices, you could buy all sizes tube ot ubeless from $9-18 per tire, including free mounting. School students could buy combination t-shirts and gympants at Lesters Clothing for Men and Boys at 1055 PA Avenue for just $1.79 with both garments numbered and stenciked. High and low-cut gym shoes black or white for #$3.98. At Bakedrs East End Clover Farm Market at 503 West 15th Street, you could get a litle of practically everything from Catsup for 19 cents a 14 oz. bottle to salad dressing in a quart jar for 39 cents to new minute brew Nescafe in a giant 12 oz. jar for $1.39.
In sports, major league baseball had a different look in 1964. Washington D. C. had a team in the American League and there were two pro football leagues-the familiar National Football League (NFL) and a completely separate American Football League (AFL). Some of the teams in the AFL, along with Pittsburgh, Cleveland and the then Baltimore Colts from the NFL would become the American Football Conference of the present NFL.
The Pirates’ Roberto Clemente continued to lead the National League batting race with a ,342 average, followed by Rico Carty and Hank Aaron both with .327 batting averages and both playing for the Milwaukee Braves.
The Pirates trailed Milwaukee by 1/2 game in the standings in a battle for fifth place, 12 1/2 games behind the front-running Philadelphia Phillies and a game and 1/2 in front of the seventh place Los Angeles Dodgers.
Owner Art Rooney commented at the Curbstone Coaches Luncheon, “It was the worst game I have ever seen.” Rooney and Steeler coach Buddy Parker agreed the Steelers 26-14 loss to the Los Angeles Rams to open the 1964 season, in which Pittsburgh lost the ball eight times on fumbles and interceptions was a lack-luster performance by the team’s offense.
The Golden Eagles (2-0) smashed Moshannon Valley 60-6 on Friday September 18, 1964 for coach John Schonewolf for Tyrone’s second straight win.
Everybody who dressed got in the game and got plenty of time in the Eagles’ largest margin of victory since 1932 when Tyrone manhandled Roaring Spring 81-0 to end the short five-year series.
A total of seven players shared in the eight TDs and six extra points scored by the Eagles at Hilltop Stadium in Houtzdale. Bill Gearhart and Dave Langenbacher score twice each, Tony Singer, who scored four TDs last week against Bellwood-Antis, Max Schnellbaugh, Bob Keefer, Rick Shellenberger and Frank Maisano each scored once and Schnellbaugh kicked four PATs, Don Friday booted one and Dale Erdley ran for one extra point.
Tyrone led 20-0 at half time when it was still pretty much a game, then put it out of reach with 20 points in each of the final two quarters.
In the opening quarter, Terry Turnbaugh hit Singer with a short pass on a third down and 19 play. Singer went up the middle, got a block from Bob McNeal at the 15 and continued on into the endzone for a 49-yard TD. Later in the quarter, sophomore QB Bob Hickes, playing halfback took a pitch from Turnbaugh and in turn tossed the pigskin to Schnellbaugh for a 47-yard TD pass. On the final play of the half, Gearhart intercepted a Mo Valley pass at the MV-five and ran it in for the easy TD.
In the third stanza, defensive guard Bob Keefer picked off a pass and returned the interception 45 yards for a score. Then a series later, Scnellbaugh recovered a Moshannon fumble and Tyrone took eight plays to march 54 yards for a score. Gearhart capped the drive with a two-yard TD over the left side. McNeal blocked a punt and Charlie Soellner recovered at the MV-eight. Langenbacher scored his first TD from three yards out to end the third quarter.
Masaino scored on a seven-yarder just four plays into the final quarter over the right side of the hard-charging line. The soph group took over from there, driving 22 yards in five calls with Shellenberger going over for a one-yard score on a quarterback sneak. Moshannon then tallied their lone score to make the score 54-6.
Tyrone scored their final TD on the next series covering 52 yards in four plays with Langerbacher goingin from the two. Bruce Tepsiic set up the score on a 38-yard pass play from Hickes.
Singer led the rushers with 75 yards on11 carries, Tepsic had 47 on four carries and Hickes 31 on seven as Tyrone outrushed Moshannon Valley 221-26.

Categories
News

Looking back at TAHS football in 1964

During the week leading up to Tyrone’s season opener against Bellwood-Antis on Friday, September 11, 1964, the new bowling season got underway at West End Lanes.
The Tyrone Church League kicked off the 1964-65 season, with other leagues scheduled including the American Legion League and Monday Night Ladies League on Monday, the Happy-Go-Lucky Ladies League, Outlaws, YMCA and Service Club Leagues on Tuesday, Merchants, Classic, Town and Country and the Tyrone-Bellwood Combo Ladies League on Wednesday, Ladies Industrial, Bald Eagle, Powder Puff and Ladies Church League on Thursday and The Poorman, Friday Non-handicap and Rainbow Mixed League bowled on Friday.
The Moose Lanes opened a week later with the Men’s “A” and “B” League scheduled for Tuesday, The Ladies League slated for Wednesday and a Mixed League on tap for Sunday.
The Tyrone Business and Professional Women’s Club held an outing at Bland’s Park with rides, miniature golf and plenty of food to honor the manager, assistant manager and 10 players of the BPW Team that recently had won the championship of League 2 of the Pee Wee Baseball League.
The group left Bilger Field, home of the Pee Wee League, on Friday night, transported by club members for several hours of fun.
Mike Turnbaugh was the manager and Gary Shildt was his assistant. Clint Turnbaugh, Dave McGlynn, Brian Anderson, Dale Albright, Jimmy Moore, Tommy Brower, Dave Frye, Wayne Yeager, Leroy Riggleman, and Tom McNelis were the lucky youngsters. Francis Gurekovich was unable to attend.
The executive committee of the Tyrone Improvement Corporation (TIC) was authorized to take steps to make arrangements to negotiate with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company for the purchase of all or part of the 27-acre Athletic Park tract, then owned by the PRR.
The TIC is considering the site for industrial development. The Group took the action following a lengthy discussion led by Dr. Edwin Hasson, president of TIC, in a meeting held at the Chamber of Commerce office.
In national politics, Senate Democrats pinned their hopes on freshmen liberals to swing the tide in favor of the administration’s health care for the aged program.
Senator Albert Gore, D-Texas, chief sponsor of the program, predicted a four-to-six vote margin for the proposed bill, which carries the approval of President Lyndon Johnson.
The comprehensive program was to provide hospitalization and nursing care benefits for 18 million elderly persons financed through higher Social security Taxes.
For car insurance, Jim Hoover at 563 Oak Street urged the reader to “Save with State Farm.” At the Tyrone News Agency for a minimum charge of $1.50 for black and white film or $2.50 for color, you could get your film processed and get a free role of film along with it. On Wednesdays, there was a Take-Home Special at the Fiesta Dairy Store at 1054 PA Avenue. For the week of the game with Bellwood, it was three hoagies for a buck or 35 cents each. Schulman’s at 1021 PA Avenue offered gym suits for $3.98 made by Mariner by Moore in Endura Loom fabric.
Former St. Louis Cardinals all-time baseball great Stan Musial, who home town was Donora PA, the same town as Ken Griffey, Sr., was hospitalized for what a hospital spokesman described as “dehydration.”
After retirement, “Stan the Man,” remained with the Cards in an executive capacity and was also the head of President Johnson’s physical fitness program.
A.J. Foyt, two-time Indianapolis 500 winner, gave tips for driving safely: Keep a safe distance, Be a good driver, Don’t look for trouble, Leave liquor alone, Have you car carefully inspected, Leave the racing to the experts on professional race tracks.
Included in that same newspaper was the announcement of five youths killed in a speeding car in Greenville, Texas and another telling of five crash victims in Alford, Massachusetts, grim reminders of failure to follow Foyt’s rules.
The big day finally came on Friday, Sept. 11, 1964. Tyrone met Bellwood-Antis at Gray Memorial Field that evening and sent the Bellwood boys back home with a loss to begin the year.
The Golden Eagles stopped an 11-game win streak by the Blue Devils, who had defeated Tyrone 13-6 in 1963 and had won 17 of their last 18 with a solid 39-14 win.
The Eagles scored in every quarter with team captain Tony Singer scoring the first three Tyrone touchdowns on 25-yard pass play from Eagle quarterback Terry Turnbaugh, a two-yard run and a 35-yard dash after picking up a B-A fumble and added a fourth TD later.
Tyrone did not have an overwhelming edge in stats, but was very opportunistic, turning two breaks into scores for a 19-0 first-half lead and was up 32-0 before Bellwood-Antis found the endzone.
“The game was won up front and on defense,” commented coach Schonewolf, “we were pleased with the spirit and hustle of the entire team.”
Following a punt by Bellwood’s Chuck Nau, which Bob McNeal returned 28 yards to the BA-32, Tyrone quickly made the first score. After Turnbaugh ran an option for eight yards, the 6-2, 180 pound junior fired a pass to Singer at the 15. A good block from Max Schnellbaugh gave Singer clear sailing the rest of the way for the TD.
Two pays after the kickoff, McNeal intercepted a Blue Devil pass at the T-48. Five plays later, it was 12-0. A 14-yard run by Singer was followed by a 11-yard burst by Bill Gearhart to the BA-27. Following an incompletion, Turnbaugh found McNeal, who took it down to the two-yard line. Singer blasted over the left side for the score from there.
Bellwood-Antis completed a pass from Colyer to Mays, but Tyrone came up with a fumble on the play, with Singer scooping up the loose ball and racing 35 yards for the his third score of the game. Max Schnellbaugh booted the PAT for a 19-0 halftime advantage.
Reserve quarterback Chuck Hickes opened the second half by providing some fireworks, picking up the bouncing kickoff at his own 21, doing some fancy footwork while picking up blockers before making a cutback near the Blue Devils-40 on the way to a 79-yard TD on the kick return.
Singer recovered a Bellwood-Antis fumble on the first play of the next series at the BA-49 and Tyrone drove the distance in 13 plays for another score. Hickes scooted for an advance of 12, Turnbaugh tossed to McNeal for a gain of 15 and Singer picked up 23 yards on two carries before Singer darted off the left side and cut back to go in for his fourth TD and Schnellbaugh added the extra point.
With the Eagles up 32-0, Bellwood-Antis got on the board in the third quarter, On the first play following the kick, Bud Colyer scampered 68 yards for the TD and junior tailback Denny Campbell ran in the PAT.
With the Eagles ahead 32-7, Bob Keefer picked off a Bellwood-Antis pass at the BA-25. Aided by a 15-yard face mask penalty, the Eagles took just four plays to score. Turnbaugh completed a pass to Schnellbaugh and the senior end took the ball in unmolested and kicked the PAT.
Bellwood-Antis scored the final TD of the evening, with Campbell getting a 27-yard gain and then tossing a 21-yard TD pass to Jim Decker. Campbell rushed for the extra point to complete the scoring.